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ACADEMIC LEADER BEHAVIOUR, INFLUENCE TACTICS IN RELATION TO ORGANISATIONAL COMMITMENT AND WORK ENGAGEMENT OF FACULTY IN HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS

PALLAVI, PHMM104001 (2015) ACADEMIC LEADER BEHAVIOUR, INFLUENCE TACTICS IN RELATION TO ORGANISATIONAL COMMITMENT AND WORK ENGAGEMENT OF FACULTY IN HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS. PhD thesis, Christ University.

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Abstract

“Education should not be limited to storage of information in our brain but should be in such a manner that it develops characters, moral, self- reliance and wisdom in a man” Swamy Vivekananda The importance of academic leader behaviour and influence tactics needs to be overemphasized, as these are the most essential components of practically every educational institution. A clear understanding of educational institution requires a thorough analysis of academic leader behaviour and influence tactics as main features. Academic leaders regularly acquire and use power. They do so deliberately and consciously as well as intuitively and unconsciously. Leadership and power do differ in goal compatibility, direction of influence on one’s subordinates and research emphasis. This study attempts to reduce drastically these differences and focus on the positives of influence tactics and leadership processes to be exercised by higher authorities for enhancing institutional effectiveness. The present investigation focused on understanding the leader’s behaviour and influence tactics adopted by individuals when th ey hold power positions, how it hinders the growth of individuals and institutions goals. Faculty Organisational Commitment, Work Engagement and the intention of stay/leave the institution of both academic leaders and faculty members working for higher educational institutions (Engineering, MBA and MCA colleges) were involved in thorough investigation. The dependent variables were work engagement and Organisational commitment. Five tools were adopted to collect data. Leader Behaviour Description Questionnaire (1962) developed by staff members of Fisher College of Business, Ohio State Leadership Studies, Influence Behaviour Questionnaire (2002) developed by Gary Yukl, Organizational Commitment Questionnaire (1991) developed by Meyer and Allen, Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (2003) developed by Schaufeli et al., and Intention to stay/leave tool developed by Dilyis Robinson. The Cronbach Alpha reliability for Leadership Behaviour Description Questionnaire (LBDQ) was 0.907; Influence Behaviour Questionnaire (IBQ) was 0.677 for academic leaders. The skewness and kurtosis reliability test for Influence Tactics, Organisational Commitment Questionnaire (OCQ) and Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES) showed that the z values falls <1.96 stating that these tools are reliable. Stage two - the final data collection from academic leaders and faculty members was fulfilled. A demographic information sheet was used to collect the details about the respondents. A sample of 542 respondents for this study representing 44 academic leaders and 498 faculty members were concentrated. The statistical techniques adopted were mean, standard deviation, analysis of variance, Pearson’s correlation, regression, Chi-square and descriptive analysis. Sixty six hypotheses were tested, among them 25 hypotheses were rejected and 41 hypotheses were accepted. The major findings of the study were Integration, Structure and Superior Orientation are the most frequently exhibited leader behaviours; Role Assumption, Tolerance Uncertainty and Reconciliation were least exhibited behaviours. According to perception of faculty members - Consultation and Inspirational Appeals were the most frequently adopted influence tactics; Ingratiation and Exchange were the least adopted tactics by academic leaders and perception of academic leaders shows that Consultation and Inspirational appeals were the most frequently adopted tactics; Pressure and Exchange tactics were least adopted by faculty members. Affective commitment and Dedication were seen in faculty members at higher educational institutions. Relationship exists between influence tactics and Organisational commitment, influence tactics and work engagement. Positive relationship was observed between organization commitment and work engagement. Regression analysis indicated leader behaviour significantly predicted influence tactics, the twelve predictors of leader behaviour explained 73.2% of the variance and Regression indicated the eleven predictors of influence tactics explained 4% and 4.5% of the variance in predicting Organisational commitment and work engagement. Regression indicated the three predictors of organisation commitment explained 36.2% of the variance which was significantly good enough in predicting Work Engagement. There exists significant relationship across academic leader, faculty members and age; significant relationship was found across academic leader, faculty members and corporate experience. For effective results, academic leaders need to understand and represent their faculty members when required. Provide freedom to faculty members for initiative decisions and actions whilst academic leaders need not surrender their role, avoid encouraging groups based on biases like region, discipline or other factors like gender and seniority. Academic leaders need to be precautious while predicting the outcomes. To increase the commitment of faculty members, academic leaders need to work on providing relevant and sufficient resources, offer assistance as and when required. Connect faculty members with expertise for effective results and hypothetical analysis show that there is low positive relationship between influence tactics and work engagement, as faculty members willingly work, sometimes mistakes occur as said “There is no human being in this world who does not make mistakes, if he does not make mistakes then he is GOD”. Under such circumstances, academic leaders need to approach faculty members out of feelings, friendship and loyalty, if it does not work then use demands, threats or frequent checking. Academic leaders must avoid involving others in persuading the faculty members. Not only, have the roles of academic leaders and faculty members affect the sustainment of quality, even the availability of resources in the attainment of goals affect the end results. One very relevant indicator of leadership effectiveness is the extent to which the performance of the team or organization is enhanced and the attainment of goals is facilitated (Bass, 2008; Kaiser, Hogan & Craig, 2008). There is controversy in understanding the roles of leaders and managers, they are qualitatively and mutually exclusive (Bennis & Nanus, 1985; Zaleznik, 1977), management needs to realize and understand that educational leaders are concerned about how things get done and try to get people agree about the most important things to be done.

Item Type:Thesis (PhD)
Subjects:Thesis > Ph.D > Management
Thesis
Thesis > Ph.D
ID Code:7838
Deposited By:Shaiju M C
Deposited On:18 May 2019 12:50
Last Modified:18 May 2019 12:50

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