Christ University Institutional Repository

BUSINESS ETHICS COURSE AND ETHICAL SENSITIVITY AMONG BUDDING MANAGEMENT GRADUATES

ANTONY CHULLY , ARUN (2012) BUSINESS ETHICS COURSE AND ETHICAL SENSITIVITY AMONG BUDDING MANAGEMENT GRADUATES. Other thesis, Christ University.

[img]PDF
Restricted to Registered users only

5Mb

Abstract

The effectiveness of ethics education in developing ethically sensitive corporate leaders is a much debated subject. In the absence of much documented research on this topic in the Indian context, this study explores the question can business schools make any impact in enhancing the ethical sensitivity of the budding management graduates. Along with this primary hypothesis, the impact of variables such as type of schooling, academic achievement and gender is also analysed. The study is conducted on 259 graduate students from 5 business schools in Bangalore. A 20 scenario questionnaire is used to measure the ethical sensitivity score. Statistical tools like ANOVA, t-test and Pearson’s coefficient of correlation are used to analyse the data. To the question how effective business ethics education in enhancing ethical sensitivity, the study found that the impact is limited. The outcome of business ethics is limited to improvement in the awareness of certain ethical issues. It does not influence the personal value orientations or inclinations to compromise ethics for self- interests and monetary benefits. This finding goes along with some of the similar researches done in other countries. The research also found that the personal values of students were developed at a young age and had been influenced by the type of school of their primary education. Students who have studied in religious affiliated schools have expressed greater ethical sensitivity compared to students studied in private or government schools for their early education. Another finding of this research challenges some of the earlier observations that academically achieving students exhibit higher sensitivity to ethical issues. The present study revealed no correlation between students’ academic achievements and ethical sensitivity. It reiterates the importance of providing holistic education than single-minded pursuit of academic excellence. The question whether one gender is superior to the other in ethical orientations is a well-researched topic, though most of such studies are done in the west. The current study in Indian context reinforces the outcome of the majority of researches which state that women tend to be more ethical than men. This study challenges the business schools to rethink the content and process of teaching business ethics to make it effective in developing the ethical quotient of future business leaders. Pedagogy that integrates critical reflection of personal values and ethical choices is recommended to make a difference. A greater sense of responsibility from the part of primary education providers and a holistic approach to education than mere pursuit of academic excellence are some of the other suggestions for introspection emerging from this research.

Item Type:Thesis (Other)
Subjects:Thesis > MPhil > Management
ID Code:5048
Deposited By:Knowledge Center Christ University
Deposited On:28 Oct 2013 15:59
Last Modified:28 Oct 2013 15:59

Repository Staff Only: item control page